Case Studies

You are here:

The Moody Endowment provides support to Transitional Learning Center at Galveston, a national pioneer in post-acute care for patients with acquired brain injury, which operates three separate facilities in Texas. In addition to funding such care and rehabilitation, The Moody Endowment has also funded numerous research projects designed to better understand brain injuries and their affects. Such research projects have dramatically improved not only the treatment of brain injuries and cognitive rehabilitation, but also the way that rehabilitation is delivered.

Below you will find two case studies of projects funded by The Moody Endowment.

Case Study: ZeroG®

ZeroG
ZeroG

ZeroG® is the complete gait and balance training system physical therapists. The system can provide patients either static or dynamic body-weight support as they practice walking, balance tasks, sit-to-stand maneuvers and even stairs. And because the system is mounted to an overhead track, there are no barriers between the patient and therapist. With ZeroG®, patients can begin rehabilitationin a safe, controlled environment.

One of the key features of ZeroG® is that it rides along an overhead track, providing barrier-free interactions between the therapist and patient. Since nothing is on the ground, subjects can practice obstacles such as stairs and uneven terrain, practice sit to stand tasks, and can use assistive devices. Subjects can begin practicing early after neurological injuries at high intensity levels, factors shown to be related to enhanced outcomes (DeJong et al., 2005; Horn et al., 2005).




Case Study: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

TMS
TMS
TMS
TMS

Traumatic brain injuries often lead to muscle control and movement impairment that require therapy to improve. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique used to rehabilitate muscle control by restoring function to the area of the brain that controls those muscles. TMS uses a focused magnetic field to reach the target area and activate the brain cells. Previously, this precise stimulation was only obtainable with surgical implants, but TMS is an entirely non-invasive, out-patient therapy. The application of TMS may benefit a variety of conditions including stroke, cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease, and other patients with impaired muscle function.

The effects of TMS can last beyond the duration of therapy by administering a series of stimulations, known as Repetitive TMS. This allows the patient to utilize the enhanced muscle function in other therapies, such as Physical and Occupational therapy.

© 2014. The Moody Endowment. All right reserved. Website Design by Studio Napoli